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TRAINING TIPS ON YOUNG DOGS

One of the greatest things to watch is a young, happy, flashy, accurate marking dog. The first step in training a young dog is gaining his confidence and being able to keep it. When the young dog does the work right, give him a “happy time” so that the next time he jumps out of the crate, he ...

TRAINING TIPS ON YOUNG DOGS

One of the greatest things to watch is a young, happy, flashy, accurate marking dog. The first step in training a young dog is gaining his confidence and being able to keep it. When the young dog does the work right, give him a “happy time” so that the next time he jumps out of the crate, he will be raring to retrieve.

As I start with a young dog, I like to give him a few birds, but I would prefer to thoroughly force break him to retrieve before I make birds a regular occurrence. In most cases, this stops many problems from occurring, such as sloppy pick-up, poor bird handling, hardmouth, and besides, it frequently assures a clean delivery.

In my opinion, trainers of young dogs frequently put too much emphasis on doubles. I have had more success in always starting with a single and adding birds, up to triple, as the dog is successful on each test. Triples for a derby dog do not serve much purpose. The main objective with the young dog is to help him learn how to find that key bird, the memory bird, and if you can concentrate on this, you will survive more trials in good shape.

When you start the water work, remember that you want to have the dog charging out into the water. This is best accomplished on easy singles. When you start on the tougher water marks and when a bank is available for the dog to run, be sure to have enough help to prevent bank running. If you can block him the first time, he is less apt to try it again.

Here are a few handling tips that might be helpful. In training, don’t make a habit of waiting too long to call for a bird. After you think the dog has spotted the gun, call for a bird quickly. You are hoping that the dog will form the habit of paying attention as soon as you sit him down on the line, whether it be in training or a field trial. On the other hand, handlers should give a young dog time to think after he delivers the fist bird and before sending him for a second bird. Take the time to line the dog in the right direction before sending him on a retrieve, particularly the second bird.

Young dogs are great to work with, but always remember, whether your objective is field trial work or hunting, keep the young retriever happy so that he will do his best to please you.


Taken from “The Retriever”, Volume 1, Number 3, November 1969
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Testimonials

August 26, 1992

Dear Jim,

I wanted to let you know that Sky completed the Master Hunter title last weekend. I am positive that if we hadn’t come down to Sanger and worked with you, we never would have been successful. As it was, I got three legs with her and the last two she was handled by Bobby George. If she can get one more leg, she will qualify for the Master National and Bobby will take her there. His training style is similar to yours so he has been able to work with me and Sky to build on the foundation you gave her.

You really convinced me that the collar program was the way to go, so I’m using it and the Double T with the puppy I discussed with you. He is out of Biz Reed’s Borego and is a grandson of AFC Atari and Zip. His name is Hardscrabble Endeavor and he is the best FCR prospect I’ve had. If we get down to Texas this winter, you can tell me what you think of him.

Thanks for all the work you did with Sky and for introducing me to the collar method of training.

Sincerely,

Miram Kearn

 


February 8, 2005

Dear Jim,

I was pleased to hear about your induction into the Retriever Hall of Fame. That seems a fitting honor for a guy who I’m sure is working as hard as I remember him from the old days. It must feel good to get some recognition for all the hours you’ve spent with so many dogs. We won’t be able to make the ceremony in Grand Junction but Jenks and I both will be thinking of you. Thanks for keeping in touch.

Sincerely,

Buddy Harris

 


February 14, 2005

Dear Jim,

Tiffany, Anne and I (along with Duke) extend our congratulations on your recent induction into the Retriever Hall of Fame. This comes of little surprise to us. It’s only fitting that the best are bestowed this honor. Your recognition is long past due.

Your Fans,

John Rubi

 


March 6, 2005

Jim,

Congratulations on your induction into the Retriever Hall of Fame! This is a great achievement which you so rightfully deserve for the hard work and dedication to the dog industry.

Sincerely,

Matlock Rose

Matlock Rose Quarter Horses

 

 

 

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